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Glossary of terms you will come across during your Phase 2 training.


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Typical 12V electrical training boardDuring the electrical module, one of the suggested exercises is to construct various electrical circuits such as parking lamps, headlamps (including relays) and glow plug circuits (including solenoid control).

In order to facilitate this exercise, we use 12V electrical training boards. These are boards of steel construction, with a working tray and a base that can accommodate a 12V battery.

This set up allows apprentices to construct the various circuits, and connect the board to an engine fitted with an alternator.

This set up allows each apprentice to wire up all the basic electrical circuits and components found in a typical plant vehicle.

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Typical 12 volt electrical test lampThis consists of a 12V lamp, with two different terminals. One terminal (the earth terminal) consists of a short cable and a crocodile clip. The other terminal is at the pointed end of the tool. It is used by fastening the crocodile clip to a good earth point, and then using the sharp end of the took to probe wires. If the wires are live, the lamp will glow.

During the induction phase of the course, you will be issued (at your own expense) with a 12V test lamp.

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Typical diodeOne of a series of diodes (the 1N4000 series). They are popular, 1 amp, general purpose, silicon rectifier diodes.

During the Phase 2 course, we use these diodes to make half-wave rectifiers, full-wave rectifiers, and to suppress voltage spiking on 30 amp relays in circuits such as the time-delay circuit built as part of the Electrical Module.

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Crowsfoot injector removal toolCrow's foot tool that allows you to tighten injector pipe unions with a 3/8" torque wrench.
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The 3 effects of electicity.

3 Effects of electricity:

  1. Chemical change  - For example, the electrolyte in a battery changes from sulphuric acid (H2SO4) when the battery is charged, to water, H2O, when the battery is discharged.
  2. Heat - For example, current passed through a bulb causes the filament to glow white hot. This is incandescent heat.
  3. Magnetism - for example, when we pass electrical current through the commutator and the field windings of a motor, like poles come into close proximity. These poles repel each other, giving us the motoring action.
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DIN numerical wiring code:

  • 15: Battery live supply controlled by the ignition switch (often referred to as 'live under key').
  • 30: Battery live or battery positive (+)
  • 31: Battery earth or Ground (-)

Other codes you will come across on Phase 2 training include:

  • 85: End of coil (for example, the end of the coil windings on an electromagnetic relay)
  • 86: Start of coil (for example, the start of the coil windings on an electromagnetic relay)
  • 87: To load (for example, on an electromagnetic relay, battery positive is supplied to terminal 30 on the relay. That leads to a set of contact points, and the far side of those contacts is terminal 87, which leads to whatever load the relay is serving.

Understanding European DIN Codes (PDF document download)

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Injector clamping boltInjector clamp bolt.
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Also written as 50 Hz or 50Hz.

This is the frequency at which mains electricity in Ireland is delivered at.

We know that in an AC circuit, rather than flow constantly in one direction, the electrons move rapidly back and forth. The rate at which these electrons move back and forth is referred to as the frequency of the supply. In Ireland, the mains AC supply has a frequency of 50 Hz. In other words, the electrons in our homes move back and forth in the wires 50 times every second when a circuit is closed.

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From Wikipedia:

555 chipThe 555 Timer IC is an integrated circuit (chip) implementing a variety of timer and multivibrator applications. The IC was designed by Hans R. Camenzind in 1970 and brought to market in 1971 by Signetics (later acquired by Philips). The original name was the SE555 (metal can)/NE555 (plastic DIP) and the part was described as "The IC Time Machine". It has been claimed that the 555 gets its name from the three 5-kohm resistors used in typical early implementations, but Hanz Camenzind has stated that the number was arbitrary. The part is still in wide use, thanks to its ease of use, low price and good stability. Read more...

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A4 lever arch folderThis is a hard covered folder for holding any course notes you may write up, and for any diagrams you may draw.

It is important to get into the habit of writing up your notes on a regular basis. To that end, you are supplied with a spiral notebook and black and red pens. During induction, you will also purchase a geometry set and a pack of markers.


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