Printer-friendly version
Glossary of terms you will come across during your Phase 2 training.



Currently sorted By last update ascending Sort chronologically: By last update change to descending | By creation date

Page:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  ...  106  (Next)
ALL

:

Fuel oil used by most plant machinery.

Rudolf Diesel

The fuel gets its name from Rudolf Diesel, the man who produced the first compression ignition engine whilst working for MAN in Augsburg, Germany, in 1897.

Check here for more information on how diesel engines work.

:

This is the unit of electrical force that pushes electrons around a circuit. This force can be small, as in the case of plant vehicles-12 volt or 24 volt, or it can be large, as in the mains electricity in a workshops-110 volt, 220 volt or 380 volt.

Check out this site for more information.

Keyword(s):
:

This is a measure of the resistance in an electrical circuit, and it is measured in ohms.

The Greek letter Omega, Ω, is often used to represent resistance in electrical circuits.

Check here for more information.

:
To boot a computer means to switch it on and allow the loading of the operating system. When the operating system (OS) is loaded and running, the user can take control of the machine.
:
The operating system (os) of a computer is the system that runs the computer and makes all the software and programs installed on it available to you, the user. In the CP computer room, the operating system is Windows 2000. Other examples of operating systems are Linux, Windows XP, Windows 98.
Keyword(s):
:

There are at least 2 different contexts where we use the word "burn" on the phase 2 cp course.

When used in the context of engines and combustion, we speak of how we burn fuel. Fuels used in plant machinery contain engrgy. In order to release that energy so that we can do some work with it, we burn the fuel. As the fuel burns, its energy is converted from chemical energy to heat energy.
Heat energy acts on the crown of the piston, forcing it down the cylinder and turning the crankshaft.
This converts the heat energy into mechanical energy. We transmit this energy through the gearbox and drive shaft to the road wheels or tracks, thus moving the vehicle. The burning process is initiated in two main ways in engines: In a petrol engine, a spark plug is used, and in a diesel engine, air is compressed so much that it becomes very hot. Into this hot air, we inject atomised fuel, which after a short delay period, begins to burn, thus releasing its energy.

When used in the context of computers, to "burn" a CD-R (Compact Disc-Recordable) is to write information to the disc by means of a low-intensity laser, which "burns" the digital information onto the disc.

:
The toggle key on a keyboard that, when selected, changes the alphabetical keys on the keyboard from lower case to capital letters.
:

An acronym based on a German phrase, Deutesches Institut fur Normung, or the German Institute for Standards.

Check here for more information.

:

Acronym for Department of Transportation, an American standard. An example of use is "DOT 5 Brake Fluid".

Check here for more information.

:

Energy is the ability to do work.
Because work is measured by multiplying the force applied by the distance moved, energy is measured in Nm or Joules.
1 Joule = 1 Newton metre. Symbol: J or Nm

If one joule of energy is expended in 1 second, one watt of power is said to have been expended.

There are many different types of energy. Some examples are:

Wind energy, solar energy, nuclear energy, electrical energy, potential engery.

:

A force is defined simply as a push or a pull.

A more comprehnesive definition is: A force is that which causes or prevents movement, or changes the direction of existing movement.

Force is measured in Newtons, after Sir Isaac Newton, who wrote Newton's three laws of motion.

Electrical force is known as voltage. A small force would be something like 4 volts. A large force would be something like 500 volts.

:
Software that is protected by copyright, but is made available to the public free of charge.
:
Term used to describe a computer that has "frozen" in operation. There may or may not be error messages on display, but the computer does not respond - the computer "freezes". Often, the only solution is to re-boot the computer. This involves the loss of any unsaved material you may be working on at the time.
:

1 kilobyte = 1024 bytes. Don't get confused here! The prefix kilo normally means one thousand, but when we are dealing with bits and bytes, we are dealing with binary numbers, and in this case 210, which is:

2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2=1024.

This type of stuff is covered during your electronics training.

:
The measurement of the amount of matter in a body. It is measured in kilogrammes.
:
A file format popular for saving music. Sound files on computers such as music can be very large. This gives problems when you want to run them, or make them available over the internet. One solution is to compress them, but this leads to a loss of quality. MP3 is a format that reduces file sizes, but keeps the drop in quality to a minimum.
:

Also sometimes referred to as "Nibble"

4 binary digits (bits) = 1 nybble (or nibble).

For example, 1101 is a nybble.

Keyword(s):
:
Short for Numeral Lock. This is a toggle key which allows the keypad at the right of the keyboard to be used to input numerals. When the Num Lock is engaged, a warning diode will glow and the keys will act as numbers. When the lock is disengaged, the keys assume other functions.
:
Power is a measure of the rate at which work is done. Work is Force x Distance, and if we measure this per second, we are measuring power. Power is measured in Watts. The unit of measurement gets its name from James Watt.
:

1: When used in the context of monitor screens, this is the number of times per second a screen is redrawn on the monitor. A typical figure would be 75 times per second. Each refresh is a cycle, so this refresh rate would be written as 75 Hertz.

2: When used in the context of websites, you may need to refresh your screen from time to time, to ensure you are viewing the most up to date information available. This would be especially necessary when viewing sites such as airport arrivals and departures pages.

:
Society of Automotive Engineers. An American Society responsible for setting technical standards in the Automotive Industry. For example: SAE 20W50 engine oil.
:

In steering geometry, Swivel (or Steering) Axis inclination, similar to KPI (King Pin Inclination).

Check here for more information.

:
Software that is protected by copyright, and is offered to the public on a trial basis. The offer of use is on the condition that, if someone tries the software and decides they want to use it, the user sends payment to the author.
:

Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders.

Visit their home page.

:

Torque is the amount of twisting or turning that a force exerts about a point. Torque may be considered work done in rotation. The unit is the Newton metre. Symbol: Nm.

For example, when you twist something, you are exerting a torque on it.

The imperial way of measuring torque is pounds feet (lb/ft) or pounds force feet (lbf/feet). There are many different units of measurement for torque, but they will always mention force (Newtons, Kilogrammes force, pounds force) and distance (metres, feet inches). It is simplest and best to use SI, but you will come across many different types of units.
:

Uniform resource locator. This is the unique address of a web site on the Internet.

For example, the URL, or Uniform Resource Locator, or web address of the CP Fitters' Homepage is: www.fascabra.com/cpweb/index.htm

:

Space void of air.

Atmospheric pressure will always seek to fill this space with air.

:

When used in the context of computers, the operating system (OS) which allows a user to interact with the machine. There are many different versions, for example: Windows 95; Windows 98; Windows 2000; Windows XP.

The machines the apprentices use whilst in Cabra on Phase 2 of their training all have Windows 2000 OS installed on them.

:
When used in the context of computers, software refers to the programmes written for computers. Examples of sotware are photo editing programmes, word processing programmes or computer operating systems.
:

When used in the context of computers, anything to do with computers that can be touched and felt: for example-a monitor, a keyboard, a mouse.

Software, on the other hand, cannot be "touched" . We can touch the cd onto which we burn the software, and that is why the cd is a piece of hardware. Software can be used when it is installed on a machine.

:

On occassion, a computer may start to behave in a strange manner, become slow in operation, may lock up or it may even become hung. To solve these problems, a reboot is required. This shuts down and restarts the computer immediately.

Reboots may also be required after updating anti-virus software, or updating your operating system.

Keyword(s):
:

Random Access Memory: This is fast memory used by computers to keep track of all open documents and programmes on a computer.

For example, as of February 2009, 1024Mb of RAM is now considered to be the absolute minimum required to run a modern OS on a computer. Perhaps 2048Mb may be a more realistic figure.

RAM is volatile memory. If you remove the power source, RAM looses any data written to it. When you open a new doucment or spreadsheet, until you save it, it only exists in the RAM. If there were a power cut, you would loose all your data and work. That is why it is important to immediately save anyting you are working on, and to continue to save it at regular intervals as you work.

:
Standards Based Apprenticeship. Apprenticeship in Ireland is now standards based, as opposed to the old system of time served. This means that the apprentice must reach a pre-determined standard at each of the phases, before they can progress to the next phase.
:
Standards Based Apprenticeship: often abbreviated to sba. Apprenticeship in Ireland is now standards based, as opposed to the old system of time served. This means that the apprentice must reach a pre-determined standard at each of the phases, before they can progress to the next phase.
Keyword(s):
:

Prefix for units of measurement: for example kilometre - a thousand metres; kilogramme - a thousand grammes.

Check here for more on prefixes and units of measurement.

:

Used in connection with combustion and air/fuel ratios. The stoichiometric, or chemically correct ratio is the mass of air in Kg required to completely burn one Kg of fuel.

For petrol, this ratio is approximately 14.7:1 and for diesel, it is approximately 14.5:1.

The Greek letter λ is used to represent this ratio.

When λ = 1, this is the stoichiometric or chemically correct ratio of air to fuel. In other words there is sufficient air present to fully burn a given quantity of fuel.

When λ < 1, the amount of air present is less than what is required to burn a given quantity of fuel. In other words, the mixture is too rich.

When λ > 1, the amount of air present is more than what is required to burn a given quantity of fuel. In other words, the mixture is too lean.

:

kV means kilovolt.

1 kV = 1,000 volts.

For example: Modern ignition systems can generate sparks of up to 40 kV.
In other words, modern ignition systems can generate sparks of up to 40,000 volts.

Check here for more on S.I. units of measurement and prefixes.

:

In terms of electronic control of vehicle systems, redundancy refers to the use of a back-up sensor in the event that the first one should fail.

For example, the accelerator pedal travel sensor is a critical one and is fitted in redundant configuration. In other words, it transmits 2 signal voltages to the ECU. One signal voltage is exactly half the value of the other. That way, should one fail, the other will be there to maintain a signal to the ECU.

Keyword(s):
:

Kilogramme (abbreviation Kg) is 1,000 grammes.

Kg are the basic S.I. unit for measuring mass.

Check here for more on basic S.I. units.

Keyword(s):
:

Apprenticeship is a method by which a person works for an employer in his or her chosen trade and learns the necessary skills, knowledge and attitudes to become a qualified craftsperson.

Apprenticeship in Ireland is now standards based, which means you will undergo specific tests and assessments to ensure you achieve certain pre-set standards of skill and competence at each of the seven phases, before moving on to the next phase.

See here for more information.

:

Friction can be defined as a force which resists or prevents movement between two surfaces in contact.

When a surface is moved over another surface with which it is in contact, a resisting force is set up that opposes the motion. This resisting force is known as the force of friction

The magnitude (size) of this force depends on the roughness of the moving surfaces in contact. The work lost in overcoming this is converted into heat energy.

It has been found that the force of friction resisting motion is usually slightly greater before one surface begins to move over the other. In other words, it is harder to get a body moving than it is to keep it moving.

See also the entries for static friction and sliding friction.

:

Boyle's law. This is one of the Gas Laws
For a fixed mass of gas at a constant temperature, the volume of the gas depends on the pressure. The more pressure, the less volume. Pressure and volume are inversely proportional to each other. If the temperature is held constant, and you double the pressure, then you halve the volume.

Expressed mathematically: P.V=C

Check here for more information.

:

Charles law. One of the Gas Laws (Boyle's Law is the other one): For a fixed mass of gas at a constant pressure, the volume of the gas depends on the temperature. The more temperature, the more volume. In other words, if you heat a gas, it will expand.

Expressed mathematically: V/T=C

Check here for more information.

:
Term used to describe the electrical force that causes an electrical circuit to function. For example, plant vehicles operate 12, 24 and 48 volt systems. Workshop mains electricity operates at 110, 220 and 380 volts.
:

From time to time, formal research work may be conducted in the CP Fitters' Section. This research work is always conducted to the highest ethical standards, and has one main goal: to improve the learning experience for each apprentice.
If there is research work in progress, all participants will have access to the Ethics Statement of the researcher.

:

A formal statement given by a person conducting research work. This statement gives written guarantees to all participants who engage in a research project.

The statement will include guarantees on the right to privacy of the participants, as well as details of how the researcher proposes to gather, analyse and present data during this process.

It is normal for the researcher to furnish each participant with a written and signed Ethics Statement.

If you require any further details or explanation please contact Matt Molloy.

:

There are 7 phases of training for CP Fitters. Phases 2, 4 and 6 are "off the job" and delivered in the FAS training centre, Cabra (phase 2), and the institutes of technology in Cork and Dublin (phases 4 and 6).

Phase 2 is of 20 weeks duration, and phase 4 and phase 6 are of 10 weeks duration each.

Phase 1, Phase 3, Phase 5 and Phase 7 are delivered "on the job" in the apprentices' place of employment.

:
Short for the Dublin Institute of Technology. As of May 2007, our information indicates that the DIT will no longer provide phase 4 and phase 6 training. Cork Institute of Technology is now the only location providing this training.
: