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Glossary of terms you will come across during your Phase 2 training.



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Friction can be defined as a force which resists or prevents movement between two surfaces in contact.

When a surface is moved over another surface with which it is in contact, a resisting force is set up that opposes the motion. This resisting force is known as the force of friction

The magnitude (size) of this force depends on the roughness of the moving surfaces in contact. The work lost in overcoming this is converted into heat energy.

It has been found that the force of friction resisting motion is usually slightly greater before one surface begins to move over the other. In other words, it is harder to get a body moving than it is to keep it moving.

See also the entries for static friction and sliding friction.

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Boyle's law. This is one of the Gas Laws
For a fixed mass of gas at a constant temperature, the volume of the gas depends on the pressure. The more pressure, the less volume. Pressure and volume are inversely proportional to each other. If the temperature is held constant, and you double the pressure, then you halve the volume.

Expressed mathematically: P.V=C

Check here for more information.

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Charles law. One of the Gas Laws (Boyle's Law is the other one): For a fixed mass of gas at a constant pressure, the volume of the gas depends on the temperature. The more temperature, the more volume. In other words, if you heat a gas, it will expand.

Expressed mathematically: V/T=C

Check here for more information.

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Term used to describe the electrical force that causes an electrical circuit to function. For example, plant vehicles operate 12, 24 and 48 volt systems. Workshop mains electricity operates at 110, 220 and 380 volts.
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From time to time, formal research work may be conducted in the CP Fitters' Section. This research work is always conducted to the highest ethical standards, and has one main goal: to improve the learning experience for each apprentice.
If there is research work in progress, all participants will have access to the Ethics Statement of the researcher.

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A formal statement given by a person conducting research work. This statement gives written guarantees to all participants who engage in a research project.

The statement will include guarantees on the right to privacy of the participants, as well as details of how the researcher proposes to gather, analyse and present data during this process.

It is normal for the researcher to furnish each participant with a written and signed Ethics Statement.

If you require any further details or explanation please contact Matt Molloy.

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There are 7 phases of training for CP Fitters. Phases 2, 4 and 6 are "off the job" and delivered in the FAS training centre, Cabra (phase 2), and the institutes of technology in Cork and Dublin (phases 4 and 6).

Phase 2 is of 20 weeks duration, and phase 4 and phase 6 are of 10 weeks duration each.

Phase 1, Phase 3, Phase 5 and Phase 7 are delivered "on the job" in the apprentices' place of employment.

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Short for the Dublin Institute of Technology. As of May 2007, our information indicates that the DIT will no longer provide phase 4 and phase 6 training. Cork Institute of Technology is now the only location providing this training.
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This term refers to the possibility of work being done: for example, a spring that is compressed has potential energy; water stored in a tank and at a height above ground level has potential energy.

A vehicle parked at the top of a hill has potential energy by virtue of its height. If we release the parking brake, the vehicle will roll to the bottom of the hill.

With potential energy, there is the possibility that work will be done.

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When we perform mathematical calculations, we operate to the base of ten. In other words, we use the digits: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9. This is the denary system.

When a machine performs mathematical calculations, they operate to the base of 2. In other words, they use the digits 0 and 1. This is the binary system.

Check here for more information on how to convert binary/denary numbers.

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