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Glossary of terms you will come across during your Phase 2 training.


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B

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Exploded view of connecting rod.

Big End; Small End

The terms 'big end' and 'small end' refer to the ends of the connecting rod (con rod) in an engine.

The big end of the con rod is bolted on to the big end journal of the crankshaft. Shell bearings are fitted here (the big end bearings), and there is always full film lubrication between the bearings and the crankshaft when the engine is running.

The small end of the con rod has the gudgeon pin passing through it, and it is used to attach the piston to the con rod.

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Bin Collection:

  • Size of Bin: 1100 litre
  • Type: General waste

Contact number: 1890 500 800

Account number: DF6541

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Greenstar:

  • Bin Type: 1100 Litre, General Waste
    Telephone No: 1890 500 800
    Account No: DF6541
    Address: 116 Grange Way, Baldoyle Industrial Estate, Dublin 15.
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When people use numbers, we use 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9. This is known as the denary system. When computers or electronic components have to deal with numbers, they can only understand the concept of something being switched on or switched off. Something switched off equates to a 0, Something swtiched on equates to a 1. This is all they can understand: 1's and 0's. This is the binary system.

Check here for more information on how to convert binary/denary numbers.

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In the context of electronics, transistors are referred to as being bipolar. They are called bipolar because both positive charge carriers (holes) and negative charge carriers (electrons) are involved in the operation of transistors.

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A binary digit, either a 1 or a 0.  The word "bit" is formed from these 2 words-binary digit = bit
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Blank or ghost firing refers to hydraulic hammers, where there might be pressurised oil trapped inside the device, even if it is disconnected from the carrier. This pressure may cause the tool to fire. If you are removing the tool, wait for ten minutes after uncoupling the hammer before you commence work.
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Bleed nipple

These can be found in many different systems, but you will most commonly come across them in braking systems. They are used to vent air and old fluid from braking systems.

The taper gives good, high pressure sealing when the nipple is tightened. When it is loosened, brake fluid can escape over the taper, through the hole and out the nipple.

The bleed nipple is picutred here with a 2 Euro coin, to give you an idea of scale and size:

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Some manufacturers use blink codes to indicate faults stored in vehicle ECUs. In this example, we introduce two faults into a 1999 Diesel Toyota Corolla: we disconnect the throttle position sensor and the intake air temperature sensor. This puts 2 fault codes into the memory. We then open the diagnostics port and, with the ignition on, place a jump wire between TE1 and E1. This outputs the fault codes to the MIL.

As we can see in the video below, we get a 24 and a 41, fault codes which correspond to the faults we introduced. When we finished, the second video demonstrates how to clear the fault memory.

Here we see the procedure for clearing fault codes from the memory:


Contributions: Seamus McKeon and Shane Prendergast, CP Fitters, May to September, 2011.

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These are gasses that 'blow-by' the piston rings during the operation of an engine. There are 2 main sources of blow-by gasses:

  1. Compression blow-by gasses: As the piston comes up on compression, some of the gasses (air and fuel) may escape down past the piston rings and into the crankcase.
  2. Power blow-by gasses: Once combustion has begun, the air fuel mixture above the piston begins to rapidly burn. This causes rapid expansion, forcing the piston down the cylinder. During this process, some of the rapidly expanding gasses can find their way down past the piston rings and into the crankcase.

Blow-by

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